Monday, September 14, 2009

Dior's Rococo Romance

The Rococo style came out of 18th century Europe. It began as a decorating movement that emphasized curving lines and ornamentation, but it soon crossed over into fashion and became a way of life. Embraced by fashionistas like Madame de Pompadour, Rococo affected architecture, decor, fashion and art.

The look was very feminine with soft lines, pastel colors and high levels of ornamentation. Romance was abundant with Cupid flying about (you'll see him in many paintings in this post). The rich embraced leisure and wore beautiful clothes in their daily masquerade of love and affection.
John Galliano's Fall 2007 Dior Couture collection brings to mind many of the ideals from the Rococo period. Though elements also reference the Victorian era and the 1947 New Look from Dior, the Rococo spirit is very clear.

Feminine. Decorative. Luxurious. Pastel. Romantic. Whimsical.


These interiors are examples of where the rich and beautiful lived their daily lives. I think it's interesting to see how the furniture and decor complement the gowns in the paintings. The elements work so wonderfully together.



I love seeing where history and modernity meet. The 1700s Madame Pompadour gown seems to have influenced John Galliano's design in color, texture and detail. Though not identical, they do share a resemblence. And then you can see the connection to Glenn Closes' gown in the picture below from the film Dangerous Liasons. Similar colors, use of trims and bows. If you want to see beautiful Rococo fashion and decor, definitely watch the movie.


You can see here how the women in their gowns interacted with their grande and beautiful surroundings.



The Queen's bedroom at Versailles.



The love of leisure and flirtations is picture perfect in Francois de Troy's Declaration of Love from 1731.

Romance could just as easily take place outdoors as architectural details entered the garden with staircases and statues (like in the painting above). Flowers and hedge designs provided a beautiful backdrop.






Cupid quietly lifts his finger to his lips because this little rendezvous is surely a secret.

Runway photos: Style.com

5 comments:

  1. This is such an amazing, well-researched post; with loads of fashionable eye candy, of course! I took an art history class a couple of years back and fell in love with Fragonard's work - namely The Swing. There was something so romantic, ethereal, and dreamlike about the strokes found within that piece. :)

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  2. Stunning post, darling! I adore the juxtaposition of fabulous runway confections with important art historical images ~ genius!

    xoxox,
    CC

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  3. What an incredibly beautiful post. Well done. Pure eye candy!

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  4. Oh my God! I mean, these clothes are amazing! I would like to live in these ages, when women could be so elegant and wear clothes like that!!

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  5. I came upon this post after a photo from it came up after typing "dior secret garden versailles" into Bing.com. I love this post and I find that Dior is heavily romantic in the Rococo sense...particularly with its haute couture and then there is the soft, feminine look of its stores. Galliano was a champion of romanticism and I will always consider his firing a great tragedy to the House of Dior. Carrying on, I, too, love Fragonard's 'The Swing'. I came across it for the first time in a book on period music in my orchestra class. I really enjoy exploring the culture of this period. It's just beautiful.

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